Cooperative Agreement: Development of a Model Approach to Arrest Data Analysis

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. The purpose of this solicitation is to develop a model approach to arrest data analysis for the purposes of informing and monitoring data driven practices.

Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables
The goal of this competitive solicitation is to fund the development of a model approach to assessing data accessibility, accuracy, and consistency for purposes of developing and/or improving data driven practices.

Objectives:

  1. Identify and understand the LaCrosse, Co. WI current arrest processes and the collection and automation of data for criminal justice reporting purposes.
  2. Develop a model approach for arrest data collection, analysis and reporting improvements.

Deliverables
In addition to the strategy and content of the program design, the successful applicant must complete the following deliverables during the project period. The program narrative should reflect how the applicant will accomplish these activities.

  1. Conduct multiple on-site meetings in LaCrosse Co., WI with law enforcement officials as well as criminal justice stakeholders to obtain knowledge and information about the current arrest, data collection and data analysis processes.
  2. Facilitate meetings with law enforcement officials to map the flow of data and develop an understanding of how information is collected, stored, analyzed and produced for internal and external reporting requirements.
  3. Develop a model approach for assessing data accessibility, accuracy, and consistency for purposes of developing and/or improving data driven practices.
  4. Develop corresponding curriculum framework for other jurisdictions to replicate the model approach to data accessibility, accuracy and consistency for the purposes of informing and monitoring data driven practices.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on August 31, 2017.


Please note effective July 1, 2013 the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) was merged to the System for Award Management (SAM).  The SAM registry and Frequently Asked Questions can be reached at http://www.sam.gov.  Please note that the registration process can take up to 1-3 weeks, so please plan accordingly.

See Us There! NIC at APPA in New York

National Institute of CorrectionsVisit the NIC exhibit booth #105/107 and sponsored presentations at the American Probation and Parole Association 42nd Annual Training Institute in New York City, August 27-30, 2017.

 

NIC Demonstration: Community Corrections and Academia Resource Micro Site

Presenters: Katie Green, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections, Elizabeth Zoby, Information Specialist, National Institute of Corrections

Room: Hudson/Chelsea 7th Floor Time Slot: Aug 30th 09:45 AM – 10:30 AM

This session in an opportunity for participants to view the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Community Corrections and Academia Resource (CCAR) micro site developed in partnership with the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) that contains learning domains that address core competency areas around community corrections identified and agreed upon by community corrections practitioners and academia. The site introduces the learning domains and includes recommended learning objectives, sample resources that academicians and practitioners may want to refer to when seeking to develop course content for these topic areas. Participants will be given an opportunity to provide feedback in a moderated discussion.

Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to review each of the learning domains and provide feedback regarding core competency areas and accompanying resources.
  • Discuss the layout of the microsite and identify additional resources to include in the micro-site.

 

Intensive Session: A Framework for Pretrial Justice: Essential Elements of an Effective Pretrial Justice System and Agency

Presenters: Lori Eville, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections, Spurgeon Kennedy,  Vice President, National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies and Joel Bishop, Executive Director of Justice, Judicial Support and Community Services, and Owner of Justice Solutions LLC

Room: Olmstead 7th Floor Time Slot: Aug 27th 01:00 PM – 05:00 PM

“Getting bail right" is the central theme of this pretrial justice workshop. To balance an individual's right to reasonable bail with the public's expectation of safety, effective systems include mechanisms for assessing the likelihood of missed court appearances and criminal activity and for providing supervision specifically designed to address these risks. The best pretrial systems will minimize unnecessary pretrial detention, increase public safety, and administer the pretrial release process fairly. The presenters at this workshop will cover the fundamentals of both an effective pretrial system and a high functioning pretrial services agency, as defined by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies (NAPSA). The workshop will focus on the essential elements necessary to improve pretrial outcomes. It will also serve as an opportunity for practitioners and policy makers to compare their current pretrial release and other front-end intervention practices with national standards and recognized evidence-based best practices in a way that will help them work toward developing or improving sound pretrial practices.

Training Objectives:

  • Cover the key components of NIC's Framework for Pretrial Justice, including the concepts and principles that relate to effective pretrial systems and agencies
  • Describe the essential elements of an effective pretrial justice system and ensure that participants can identify those system elements they currently have in place or need to improve
  • Describe the essential elements of an effective pretrial services agency and ensure that participants can identify those practices they currently have in place or need to improve

 

Leading with Purpose and Impacting the Future of Community Corrections

Moderator: Greg Crawford, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections, Presenters: Susan Burke, Director, Utah Division Juvenile Justice Services, Scott M Taylor, Director, Multnomah County Community Justice,  Mack Jenkins, Retired Chief Probation Officer, San Diego County Probation

Room: Harlem 7th Floor Time Slot: Aug 29th 09:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Over the last 30 years, there has been a significant rise in the number of individuals entering the criminal justice system. Per the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), in 2013, there were 6.9 million people under some form of correctional supervision, or about 1 in 35 adults in the United States. Being convicted of a crime has tremendous collateral consequences. Today, we have a better understanding of what works in the criminal justice system. Front-end intervention programs and pretrial, probation, and parole supervision are proven and safe alternatives to incarceration that effectively protect the public. This workshop is sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC).

Training Objectives:

  • Discuss the traits needed for the next generation of leadership in community corrections
  • Highlight leadership skills and strategy around building partnerships with stakeholders, with recognition of the difference between collaboration and cooperation
  • Demonstrate the importance of interpreting data and research and how that translates into policy
  • Show how to incorporate and articulate data and research to influence funders/budgets
  • Emphasize the importance of media and the need to develop key messages about community corrections

 

Let's Talk about Supervision of Justice Involved Women

Moderator: Francine Peretta, Executive Director, Association of Women Executives in Corrections, Presenters: Michelle Aguilar, Community Justice Manager, Multnomah County Oregon Adult Community Justice, Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections

Room: Duffy/Colombia 7th Floor Time Slot: Aug 29th 02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

This session in an opportunity for participants to engage in a moderated discussion and question-and-answer session about challenges and opportunities in community supervision of justice-involved women. Much of the gender-informed work with women has focused on institutional populations, and community supervision provides challenges not experienced in an incarcerated setting. Agencies across the country have adopted practices to enhance supervision practices with women, including single-gender caseloads, use of validated risk and need assessment tools, adoption of a casework management system for women, and development of programs focusing on parenting and family issues. However, rates of recidivism for women for technical violations are higher than with men. This workshop is sponsored by National Institute of Corrections (NIC).

Training Objectives:

  • Discuss what various agencies have implemented to improve community supervision of justice-involved women
  • Discuss models of practice and tools that are currently available to improve supervision of justice-involved women\Engage with participants who are willing to share their experiences and join in a discussion regarding challenges, opportunities, and new ideas about supervising justice-involved women in the community
  • Elicit and answer a variety of questions that bring focus to common areas of interest, concerns, and needs that might be addressed in future work at NIC

 

The Purpose of Involving Victims in Paroling/Reentry Decisions

Moderator: Lorie Brisbin, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections, Presenter: Lydia Newlin, Program Director, Victim Assistance and Restorative Justice, MN Department of Corrections

Room: Gramercy/Olmstead 7th Floor Time Slot: Aug 29th 03:15 PM – 04:15 PM

Victim rights statutes in most states and jurisdictions require corrections agencies or paroling authorities to include victim input or impact statements in the offender release or parole decision process. The purpose for victim participation varies from state to state and decision to decision. Some states or jurisdictions are required to take into consideration the impact of the offense at the time of the offense when making decisions about an offender's release or parole. Other states or jurisdictions take the viewpoint that the impact of the offense was considered at sentencing and therefore shouldn't influence a decision regarding release or parole. In this context, victims should still be provided the opportunity to provide input, but that input should not include the impact of the offense. And some states and jurisdictions do not have clear guidelines on the content or purpose of the victim's input. What is clear is that whenever victims are provided the opportunity to provide input at the time of parole or release decisions, it is critical that the purpose of their input and the scope of its potential impact on such decisions is clear to both to the paroling authority and the victim.

Training Objectives:

  • Familiarize participants with the complexity of victim participation laws in various states and jurisdictions
  • Clarify the distinction between victim impact and input
  • Ensure that participants are able to recognize critical and key information
  • Provide participants with tools to use to develop victim input at offender release or reentry