NIC Training: Orientation for Probation and Parole Chief Executives

nic-logo-color-300dpiNIC continues to recognize the value of orientation for new probation and parole executives. This 40 hour blended learning course focuses on presenting core competencies and their related skills and behaviors to assist new chief executives with both the immediate knowledge and the long-term skills needed in the areas of leadership, personnel, strategic planning, staff safety, collaboration, fiscal resources, and other organizational development issues.

The blended training program consists of 3 phases:
Phase 1: Assignments completed online prior to attending the classroom based sessions.
Phase 2: Classroom – based sessions
Phase 3: Assignments completed through distance learning technologies after classroom based session is complete.

Apply by: March 31, 2017

Dates for the face-to face training: June 6, 2017- June 8, 2017

For more Information and to Apply

Register Now: Justice Involved Women: Developing an Agency-Wide Approach

In April, NIC is offering a research based, gender-informed (women) trainingnic-logo-color-300dpi designed for making systemic changes to improve management of justice involved women.

The program is delivered in three sequential phases – on line learning, face-to-face training and follow up coaching. Through blended learning delivery this 36-hour program leads participant teams through strategic planning to develop an agency plan that provides coordination and direction to manage women offenders effectively. The plan will guide development of agency policies and procedures to ensure that responsive and effective services are provided to meet the supervision and programming needs of justice involved women. The curriculum is designed to assist agencies to implement planned change.

Apply by: Feb. 21, 2017

Dates for the face-to face training: Apr. 18, 2017- Apr. 20, 2017

For more Information and to Apply

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This announcement is available at NIC’s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls.  Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues.  Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe.

For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.

See Us There! NIC at ACA in San Antonio

National Institute of CorrectionsVisit the NIC exhibit booth #111 and sponsored workshops at the American Correctional Association Winter Conference in San Antonio, January 20-24, 2017.

A-2F Changing Behavior With Functional Analysis and Individualized Behavior Management Plans (IBMPs)

Every interaction we have with offenders has the potential to modify behavior. Our response, or lack thereof, has the potential to either increase, maintain or decrease the frequency of that behavior in the future. In corrections, we are routinely asked to address problematic offender behaviors. Many attempts at behavior change are doomed from the start because of lack of input from front-line staff; limited understanding of behavioral principles; a lack of consistency; an absence of communication across disciplines, shifts and institutions; a failure to consider the function(s) of the behavior(s); and an emphasis placed on the benefit of short-term gains (at the expense of long-term benefits). This session introduces a process for the initiation and development of Individual Behavior Management Plans (IBMPs).

Moderator: Joseph (Tony) Stines, CPS, NIC

Speakers: Rain Carei, Psychologist 4, Washington State Department of Corrections, Tumwater, Washington; Ryan Quirk, Psychologist 4, Washington State Department of Corrections, Tumwater, Washington

B-3I Victim Services in Corrections — A Balancing Act

Communication between victims and offenders can be challenging for agencies and their staff for a variety of reasons. It is important for agencies to have policies and strategies that provide safety for victims and hold the inmate accountable while protecting the rights of both parties. This panel discussion will explore some of the most frequently misunderstood victim-related issues regarding notification procedures, no-contact orders and visiting policies and processes, and victim/offender dialogue programs that are relevant to corrections in an institutional setting. In addition, this panel will provide an overview of the importance of providing restorative options for victims such as victim offender dialogue and apology letter processes for victims who seek accountability processes beyond sentencing sanctions in correctional and community supervision settings.

Moderator: Lorie Brisbin, CPS, NIC

Speakers: Jeralita “Jeri” Costa, Community Victim Liaison, Washington Department of Corrections, Washington; Lydia Newlin, Director, Victim Assistance and Restorative Justice, Minnesota Department of Correction, Minnesota; Angie McCown, Director Victim Services Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Austin, Texas; Mark Odom, Deputy Director, Victim Services Division, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Austin, Texas; Anne Seymour, National Victim Advocate, Washington, D.C

C-1G Victims Behind Bars: Implementing Policy and Procedures to Identify and Address Sex Trafficking of Women Offenders

We always think the victim is on the street and the perpetrator of injustice is behind bars. Under a Federal Law ,VTVPA) and State law we have unidentified and unsupported victims behind bars everyday with their exploiter as possibility a trafficker, pimp, abuser or boyfriend. The goal of this workshop will be to provide an awareness of The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000, identifying policy and procedures that sustain the victimization  of women under the supervision of jails and prisons, and strategies to create a pathway for :Prevention, Protection and Prosecution.

Moderator Evelyn Bush, CPS, NIC

Presenters: Director Gary Mohr , Ohio DOC, Raul S. Banasco, Executive Chief Deputy Tarrant County Sheriff’s Office , Heidi Bishop, Mental Health Caseworker, Ohio DOC , Jeff Beasley, Chief of Investigations Leon County Sheriff's Office

Farewell Message from NIC Director Jim Cosby

MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR

January 17, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

As my term serving as Director of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) comes to an end, I wanted to send this message to the thousands of correctional and criminal justice practitioners across America.

During my tenure, our focus at NIC has been to provide leadership, training, and technical assistance to the field of corrections, covering a wide array of topics. For example:

  • NIC has contributed to driving down unnecessary incarceration while maintaining public safety in our country. Efforts to enhance correctional and criminal justice practice are effective and are making a difference in the lives of correctional and criminal justice staff as well as justice involved  individuals every day.
  • Our staff wellness efforts have drawn necessary attention to the everyday stressors in this profession and provided guidance for improving overall health  of correctional staff.
  • We have provided the opportunity to touch tens of thousands of justice involved individuals' lives through our efforts on workforce development  and employment retention, cognitive restructuring, evidence based decision making, and transition from jail or prison to the community just to mention a few.

Other efforts at NIC have focused on particular problems within the correctional arena such as restrictive housing (solitary confinement). NIC provides training to state and local practitioners that enhance staff safety and lessen the likelihood individuals will be released directly from restrictive confinement into our communities. These programs enhance and protect public safety.

NIC has also provided special efforts for specific populations within our criminal justice system, providing better chances of success for those justice involved individuals. Our veterans program has shined a spotlight on how we can better manage and support veterans who have served their country, but later found themselves involved in our justice system. Our LGBTI and gender responsive programs have guided correctional agencies on how to respectfully work with and protect these populations. Further, our guidance and training on pretrial and criminal diversion practices have proven successful in controlling and often reducing jail populations, which is also a very sound fiscal practice.

Overall, our most successful programs involve true collaboration at the local and state levels. When criminal justice stakeholders effectively work with one another, the results are positive  and successful in meeting mutual goals. We are stronger and more effective at enhancing public safety working together than when we stand alone.

It has been the honor of my professional career to serve as the Director of the National Institute  of Corrections, and I thank each member of the criminal justice community for affording me that privilege. I encourage all of you in the field to continue the good work of improving our criminal justice system; what you do is an important service to your country and it matters.

Sincerely,

Jim Cosby
Director
National Institute of Corrections

In the News: New Center Allows Overnight Visits for Female Inmates, Their Children

Overnight visitationPosted in the Memphis Flyer, this article describes a new program for overnight visitation at the West Tennessee Women’s Therapeutic Residential Center.  The program is designed to maintain positive ties between female inmates and their families during incarceration. The facility provides a common room, kitchenette, living area, and bedrooms for the inmate and child.

Access the full article

 

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This announcement is available at NIC’s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls.  Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues.  Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe.

For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.

Cooperative Agreement: Inmate Behavior Management Initiative Enhancement

See Questions and Answers below:

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Inmate Behavior Management Initiative Enhancement. This program furthers NIC’s mission by building capacity of state and local correctional agencies to develop and establish effective inmate management strategies.

Objectives:

  1. Promote an operational philosophy that recognizes the need to effectively manage inmate behavior by direct supervision or increased supervision by staff (IBM)
  2. Review and revise the current Direct Supervision and IBM curricula including modification for a comparable prisons version of each curriculum
  3. Develop a training-for-trainers curriculum on IBM to include comparable versions for both jails and prison
  4. Pilot all revised, modified, and newly developed curricula

DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on March 2, 2017.


Please note effective July 1, 2013 the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) was merged to the System for Award Management (SAM).  The SAM registry and Frequently Asked Questions can be reached at http://www.sam.gov.  Please note that the registration process can take up to 1-3 weeks, so please plan accordingly.

Questions and Answers:

Following are the responses to questions received as of January 6, 2017 in response to the above solicitation:

Question 1:  Are the eligible parties limited to jails and prisons?
Answer: Direct supervision is designed specifically for jails and prisons. While you are eligible to apply, the requirements for subject matter experts from jails and prisons must be met to be considered responsive. Please see the “Specific Requirements” section within the solicitation for further details regarding the requirements.  
    
Question 2: What is the total award max value and length of project?
Answer: NIC is not listing a specific award amount for this project. We are seeking the best qualified and most responsive applicant at the best value. Please see the “Federal Award Information” section within the solicitation for additional details regarding the award and length of award.    
    
Question 3: Would our Department be eligible to apply? Is this grant/agreement a program for training only? If its not, what is the grant amount?
Answer:   Yes. You are eligible to apply. Please see the “Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables” section for the details on the deliverables for this cooperative agreement. NIC is not listing a specific award amount for this project. We are seeking the best qualified and most responsive applicant at the best value. Please see the “Federal Award Information” section within the solicitation for additional details regarding the award and length of award.

NIC Training: Justice Involved Women: Developing an Agency-Wide Approach

In April, NIC is offering a research based, gender-informed (women) trainingnic-logo-color-300dpi designed for making systemic changes to improve management of justice involved women.

The program is delivered in three sequential phases – on line learning, face-to-face training and follow up coaching. Through blended learning delivery this 36-hour program leads participant teams through strategic planning to develop an agency plan that provides coordination and direction to manage women offenders effectively. The plan will guide development of agency policies and procedures to ensure that responsive and effective services are provided to meet the supervision and programming needs of justice involved women. The curriculum is designed to assist agencies to implement planned change.

Apply by: Feb. 21, 2017

Dates for the face-to face training: Apr. 18, 2017- Apr. 20, 2017

For more Information and to Apply

——————————————————————————————————

This announcement is available at NIC’s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls.  Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues.  Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe.

For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.

Thinking for a Change in Seneca County Jail

t4c In October of last year, Seneca County started their first T4C group. The staff at the facility see the same people over and over again. Seneca county officials implemented the program to address this issue. They believe it will improve public safety and reentry outcomes.

During intake, new inmates are given a test to determine their risk of reoffending. Those who rate medium to high-risk are eligible for the voluntary program. T4C is a 25 lesson intensive program that addresses criminal thinking. It incorporates research from cognitive restructuring theory, social skills development, and the learning and use of problem solving skills. T4C is an integrated cognitive behavioral change program authored by Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D., under a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). 

 

Read more about what Seneca County is doing: here

Find more information about Thinking for a Change 4.0: here

Updated: Cooperative Agreement: Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance

See Questions and Answers below:

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance. This program furthers NIC’s mission by building the capacity of federal, state, local, and tribal correctional agencies to independently evaluate and assess staffing requirements, perform staffing calculations, develop a staffing plan, produce a comprehensive staffing report, and monitor and evaluate the implementation of recommendations from the staffing analysis.

Program-Specific Information

NIC’s Staffing analysis training has been conducted separately by both the prisons and jails divisions using separate curricula in  classroom setting comprised of participants from multiple facilities or agencies. Materials for the four-day Prison Staffing Analysis Training Program include Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual, facilitator guide with field exercise and presentation guidelines appendix, and a PowerPoint Presentation. Materials for the four-day Jails Staffing Analysis Training Program include Staffing Analysis Workbook for Jails, 2nd Edition, facilitator guide, participant guide, and a PowerPoint Presentation.

In an effort to build the capacity of federal, state, local and tribal correctional agencies to conduct staffing analysis, NIC expects that a blended approach, which includes e-learning and a universally applicable manual, will serve a broader audience of agencies. Ease of use will be critical to the success of this manual. Through this cooperative agreement, NIC seeks to develop a comprehensive staffing analysis manual, applicable to both prisons and jails, develop a staffing analysis e-learning course, and identify two (2) sites (1 jail/1 prison) to pilot the manual. To aid the development of the manual, three (3) to four (4) peer reviews of both the draft 3rd Edition Jail Staffing Analysis (2009) and the Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual (2008) will be conducted prior to the award of this solicitation. Through this process, content recommendations and process updates that address staffing challenges and the requirements of today’s correctional facilities are anticipated.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on March 6, 2017.


Please note effective July 1, 2013 the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) was merged to the System for Award Management (SAM).  The SAM registry and Frequently Asked Questions can be reached at http://www.sam.gov.  Please note that the registration process can take up to 1-3 weeks, so please plan accordingly.

Questions and Answers

Following are the responses to questions received January 18, 2017 in response to the above solicitation:

Question 1:   For the jail curriculum pilot, does NIC have a preference or guidelines on the jail size (i.e., small or medium)? If yes, what are the size parameters?

Answer:  The staffing analysis manual that will be piloted should not be considered a prisons or jails curriculum, rather a staffing manual for correctional facilities.  The size and operations of the jail should be suited to thoroughly test the manual and their personnel should have the capacity to provide thorough, constructive feedback.

Question 2:  The solicitation identified the Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual dated 2008. There is a NIC Prison Staff Analysis Curriculum that exists with a revision date of September 30, 2012. Can you confirm the 2012 prison program curriculum is the version to be considered for this solicitation?

Answer: The staffing analysis manual that will be created from this cooperative agreement should not be considered a manual for prisons or jails, rather a staffing manual for correctional facilities.   NIC staffing analysis materials to be used in it’s (Staffing Analysis Manual for Correctional Facilities) development are:

Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual (2008)
Prison Staffing Facilitator Guide with Field Exercise Appendix (2012)
Prison Staffing: PowerPoint Presentation (2012)
Peer Reviews of Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual (2008)
Staffing Analysis Workbook for Jails, 2nd Edition (2003)
Jails Facilitator Guide (2014)
Jails Participant Guide (2014)
Jails PowerPoint Presentation (2014)
Draft 3rd Edition Jail Staffing Analysis (2009)
Peer Reviews of the draft 3rd Edition Jail Staffing Analysis (2009)

Question 3:  While not specifically mentioned in the grant, is it anticipated that the Awardee is responsible for travel, lodging, and per diem of the participants in the pilot?

Answer:  Participants shall be personnel from the agency selected to conduct the pilot, therefore participant expenses are not applicable.

Question 4:  Is it NIC’s expectation that the Awardee will publish the manual or shall Awardee provide manuscripts or galleys reading for printing?

Answer:  The Awardee shall provide a final manuscript for the publication.

Cooperative Agreement: Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance. This program furthers NIC’s mission by building the capacity of federal, state, local, and tribal correctional agencies to independently evaluate and assess staffing requirements, perform staffing calculations, develop a staffing plan, produce a comprehensive staffing report, and monitor and evaluate the implementation of recommendations from the staffing analysis.

Program-Specific Information

NIC’s Staffing analysis training has been conducted separately by both the prisons and jails divisions using separate curricula in  classroom setting comprised of participants from multiple facilities or agencies. Materials for the four-day Prison Staffing Analysis Training Program include Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual, facilitator guide with field exercise and presentation guidelines appendix, and a PowerPoint Presentation. Materials for the four-day Jails Staffing Analysis Training Program include Staffing Analysis Workbook for Jails, 2nd Edition, facilitator guide, participant guide, and a PowerPoint Presentation.

In an effort to build the capacity of federal, state, local and tribal correctional agencies to conduct staffing analysis, NIC expects that a blended approach, which includes e-learning and a universally applicable manual, will serve a broader audience of agencies. Ease of use will be critical to the success of this manual. Through this cooperative agreement, NIC seeks to develop a comprehensive staffing analysis manual, applicable to both prisons and jails, develop a staffing analysis e-learning course, and identify two (2) sites (1 jail/1 prison) to pilot the manual. To aid the development of the manual, three (3) to four (4) peer reviews of both the draft 3rd Edition Jail Staffing Analysis (2009) and the Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual (2008) will be conducted prior to the award of this solicitation. Through this process, content recommendations and process updates that address staffing challenges and the requirements of today’s correctional facilities are anticipated.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on March 6, 2017.


Please note effective July 1, 2013 the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) was merged to the System for Award Management (SAM).  The SAM registry and Frequently Asked Questions can be reached at http://www.sam.gov.  Please note that the registration process can take up to 1-3 weeks, so please plan accordingly.